Archive for December, 2007

Lake Fork Guide List

December 30, 2007

It is that time of year, if you haven’t already booked a guide for 2008 Spring you might already be too late. This is a list I have put together of the guides here on Lake Fork, if you know any to add to the list feel free to leave a comment.

Larry Barnes 903-765-3858
James Brumfield 903-765-2548
Marcel Bryson 903-765-3629
Craig Cain 972-977-5865
James Caldemeyer 903-736-9888
Dennis Canada 903-473-8739
Rick Carter 903-765-3474
Shane Casey 972-365-7642
Joe Chancy 972-951-0818
Tony Clark 903-473-3956
Rick Collis 903-473-2047
Brian Duplechain 903-765-3131
Tom Evans 903-383-3059
Jimmy Everett 903-765-3980
Johnny Glass 903-765-2731
Charlie Hodges 903-474-1203
Jeff Gun 903-765-2155
Jason Hoffman 903-456-3691
Kenneth Jones 903-850-5555 -Catfish
Jeff Kirkwood 800-965-0350
Lee Knight 903-765-2548
Larry Large 903-765-2548
Larry Lovell 903-473-1555
Rick Loomis 903-383-3050
Richard McCarty 903-383-2864
Marc Mitchell 903-438-0266
Mike Moody 903-839-1511
Terri Moon 903-383-7773 -Crappie
John Morris 903-454-6910
Randy Oldsfield 903-962-3056
Gary Paris 903-763-2801
J.W. Peterson 214-236-3320
Chuck Pratt 903-882-9038
Jim Purdy 972-495-6073
Jim Reaneau 903-383-3320
Tom Redington 214-683-9572
Brooks Rogers 903-763-0595
Micheal Rogge 903-850-8855
Sherry Ruslink 903-383-7310
A R Sachtleben 903-765-3619
Dough Shampine 903-474-0508
Dennis Sheley 903-629-3826
Dan Silcox 903-765-3611
Gene Snider 903-383-7668 cell 903-638-1215
Dennis States 903-473-2039
Barbara Stevenson 903-765-3120
Mark Stevenson 903-765-3120
Dean Stroman 903-383-7214
John Tanner 903-763-0338
David Vance 903-629-7699
Ricky Vandergriff 903-530-2201
Ray Vereen 903-473-9528
Lance Vick 903-312-0609
Tim Walker 903-765-3613
Bill Welborn 903-768-2251
Lee White 903-383-2725
Richie White 903-439-2266
Mark Woodruff 903-765-9033

Advertisements

Sorry for the lack of reports-

December 29, 2007

I am doing my best to keep this site up to date with current fishing conditions here at Fork, but the problem is that there are just simply not many people fishing. I have been fishing every few days with a few decent days fishing 1/2oz KT spoons in 25-35ft with fish ranging 2-5lbs. I am NOT finding the deep fish stacked up like I did last year at this time, water temp is in the 50’s right now and

If your freezer fishing the yellow bass are plentiful and easy to catch at nearly any deep public hole-

The red rattletrap season has kicked off a tad early this year, we had a 12lber reported today from a man bank burning a 1/2oz Bill Norman in 8ft along with some assorted 4-6lb fish. I have a ton of red traps on order, but they are a week or so out and many places on the lake are out of stock so bring’em with you.

Please remember this is the Sharelunker season, a 13.44 was reported to be released on the east arm of the lake and the angler nor the shop owner were not aware the season had started until after the fish had hit the certified scales and was released.

Cameron Burnett

Lake Fork Guide Tom Redington Fishing Report 12-28-2007

December 29, 2007

Happy New Year to everyone. Thanks to all of my friends, family, and customers for a fabulous 2007 and I hope everyone has a year of great catches in 2008. As we head into the New Year, the early stages of prespawn are starting in some areas of the lake. Meanwhile, lunker bass continue to be caught from deep water as well. With big bass smoking jigs, swimbaits, spinnerbaits, and lipless crankbaits now through March, this is my favorite time of the year on Fork. Numbers run lower this time of year; however, the average size of your catch is at its highest for the year, usually in the 3.5 to 5 lb range, with a good shot at bass 7 lbs or greater.

Lake Conditions: Fork came up a little with recent rains and is about 3” below full pool, currently reading 402.72’. The lake is full of aquatic vegetation, with a deep weedline anywhere from 8’ to about 15’. The main lake is clear, while the creeks are ranging from clear to stained. Water temps are generally holding in the low to mid-50s, normal wintertime water temps for Fork.

Location Pattern: From late-December through much of March, I concentrate on prespawn and staging fish on points and along edges of flats or creek channels. Areas with submerged vegetation (primarily hydrilla, milfoil or coontail) for cover will typically have the most active fish. While about any grassy area will hold a few fish, start your search in areas that have lots of spawning fish in late February through March. It stands to reason that the coves that hold the most spawning fish in early spring will have the most prespawn fish in the winter. Main lake grass beds near the mouths of these coves are holding a lot of fish now, as are main and secondary points inside the coves, provided there is deep water nearby. During warming trends, follow bass back into the creeks and check the edges of grass flats and creek channels.

Keep in mind, too, that the absolute water temperature is not nearly as important now as the recent water temperature trend. For instance, water temps that are showing 52 degrees can result in slow fishing if the temps were 58 a couple days ago. In contrast, fishing can be great if the temps warm up to 50 while they were 44 a few days before. In general, look for bass on the flats and farther back in creeks during warming trends; conversely, drop back to points and main lake grassbeds after cold fronts. Finally, the day of and the day after cold fronts can be absolutely miserable to fish, but these frontal days after a long warming trend are usually the most productive times to fish.

For deep structure enthusiasts, points, roadbeds, humps, flats and ledges in 18’ to 45’ will produce some big fish during the winter months as well. Use your electronics to find the schools of bass and baitfish and work them over with spoons and dropshots. I’m primarily concentrating on the shallow bass, so my presentation pattern will focus on that.

Presentation Pattern: My wintertime arsenal is pretty simple for fishing along grasslines and creek channels. First and foremost are red lipless crankbaits in ½ or ¾ oz. Stick with the ½ for grass that is near the surface and go with the ¾ for grass that is deeper. Buzzing these over the top of the grass on a quick retrieve is working best now, but after cold fronts, letting the trap fall and ripping these out of the grass will trigger most of the bites. ¼ to ½ oz spinnerbaits with double willow blades in white, red, or chartreuse and white will produce some really large bass in the same areas that the lipless cranks work, especially on windy and cloudy days. For a true giant, try swimming the new 5.5” Lake Fork Live Magic Shad in the same areas you’d throw a spinnerbait. Rig it on a 7/0 wide gap hook and swim it slowly back to the boat with a few pauses. When the water looks like a toilet just flushed, it’s time to set the hook!! When the bite slows or the conditions are sunny and calm, I’ll switch to a suspending jerkbait or pitch a jig and a Texas rig. Jerkbaits in gold or clown patterns are my primary colors. Work these with long pauses over the grass and along the edges. For jigs, I go with ½ oz black and blue jigs with a Lake Fork Craw trailer in the blue bruiser color. For the Texas rig, I’ll pitch a Lake Fork Flipper in black neon or blue bruiser with a ¼ to 3/8 oz bullet weight. Work your jig or Texas rig very slowly along creek channels or through deep grass for your best shot at a lunker.

Cover lots of water until you get bit. Once you catch one, work the area over thoroughly with multiple passes, employing several different baits. Fish tend to stack up in key staging areas during the winter and these spots will replenish themselves with more fish during the prespawn as more and more big bass move shallow. Find some good staging spots and you’ll have a milk run of honey holes now through March.

Website Update: My January fishing article on catching big bass will be added to my website shortly (it may be up already): http://www.lakeforkguidetrips.com/fishingarticles.htm . In addition, I’ve added a discussion forum to my website. It’s new, and I’m hoping it will be a great place to find out more information about fishing Lake Fork and my services. Feel free to join the discussion at: http://www.lakefork.proboards91.com/index.cgi My January article is posted here as well.

Boat for Sale: My 2007 Ranger Z21 boat is for sale and I’ve reduced the price. I picked it up in late October of last year and it is fully loaded, rigged with a 250 HP Yamaha with a 5 year warranty. It’s value priced and will save you over $10,000 off the cost of a new boat. For more details and pics of the boat, please check my website (www.lakeforkguidetrips.com) or drop me a note.

Here’s hoping you catch the lunker of your dreams. If I can be of assistance, please contact me at 214-683-9572 (days) or 972-635-6027 (evenings) or e-mail me through http://www.LakeForkGuideTrips.com , where your satisfaction is guaranteed.

Good Fishing,

Tom

Jimmy Everett Lake Fork Report 12-13-07

December 13, 2007

Winter time fishing seems to be hear on Fork. With the weather changing so much come to Fork prepaid for anything. The deep bite has definitely been the best for numbers and overall size. There are still plenty of fish running the shallows in the grass beds located on the main lake and creeks.

My shallow water bite has been mainly covering water till I find a stretch of grass that is holding several fish. I have only been throwing a lipless crank bait for the last few days. My best colors have ranged from gold/black, chrome/blue, and any craw patterned bait with orange in it. I am throw these across grass beds on a constant retrieve with a slight twitch in the throughout the cast. The best thing to do is put the trolling motor on and cover water.

Start looking more at your creek channels in the back of creeks from 6 to 12 feet of water for some good fish. A black/blue/purple or watermelon/red 1/2ounce Strike Works Wood Jig. Flip and pitch to every piece of cover along the creek and pay attention because some of the bites are a little light and maybe just some line movement.

For that deep water action tie up a Carolina rig, a drop shot, a swim bait, and a 6 inch spoon for some good action. Turn on your graph and start graphing those deep water humps, points, ridges, and roadbeds in 20 to 35 feet of water. Look for the bass, barfish, and or shad grouped up in small areas. Once these are located this is the time to break out the tackle. For the fish near the bottom or on the bottom pick up the rig or the drop shot. My best baits for the rig will be a Zoom Super Fluke or a Gary Yamamoto Lizard and once again in the green, browns, and pumpkins with chartreuse dyed tails. Work these baits slowly along the bottom with short pauses for most of your bites. The fish are mainly feeding when found like this so the bites tend to be easy to feel. If the fish you find on your graph seem to be bunched up off the bottom, such as suspended fish, try throwing the swim baits or spoon in a shad or chrome patter through the middle of the school. The best methods I have found are the count down or a cast past the fish and try to bring it through them.

 Good luck on the water and be safe,
Guide Jimmy Everett
http://www.fishinlakefork.com
903-216-1867
jimmy@fishinlakefork.com

Tom Redington Lake Fork Guide Report December 3rd 2007

December 3, 2007

With cooler nights and shorter days, the bass at Lake Fork are settling into late fall and winter patterns. With a week of 60s and 70s forecasted, now’s a good time to avoid the crowds at Fork and enjoy some good fall fishing. As the water cools, numbers start to run lower on average, although you can catch a boatload of fish on the right days. While numbers start to decline, big fish become more common and will only continue to increase as we move towards the spawn in March and April. Go fishing after several days of stable weather, especially right before a front, and you’ll be able to catch big bass in deep or shallow water this month.

With the holidays just around the corner, I do have gift certificates available for those looking for a present for their angling buddies. 2007 has been a fantastic year on Fork, benefiting from ample rains and a full lake. With prespawn starting in late-December, it won’t be long until my favorite lunker time of the year is here, January through March. And with the lake in such good shape, Fork should be awesome in ’08.

Lake Conditions: Fork is 5” below full pool right now, currently reading 402.58’ and dropping very slowly. The lake is full of aquatic vegetation, with a deep weedline anywhere from 8’ to about 15’. The main lake is clear, while the creeks are ranging from clear to stained. Water temps are general holding in the mid-50s, good wintertime water temps for Fork.

Location Pattern: Depending on the conditions, the bite may be best in shallow grass or on deep structure. Early and late and all day on cloudy and windy days are typically the best times for the shallow grass bite. When the sun gets up, concentrate on the deep weed edge in 8’ to 15’ and creek channels running through grass flats in large coves. You’ll find fish over the flats more after warming trends, while fronts typically drive them more towards the creek channels or into thick deep grass. Most fish are in groups, so you’ll fish for a while without getting a bite, and then catch several in a small area. When the shallow bite is off, concentrate on main lake structure in 14’ to 40’. Find the schools of yellow bass and the big largemouth will be with them. Normally, you’ll find the fish schooling shallower on windy and cloudy days, while it’s not uncommon to catch fish on Fork in the wintertime in 38’ or deeper on sunny days after a front.

Presentation Pattern: As the water cools, I start to limit the variety of baits that I throw, sticking with key lures and working areas thoroughly. In the shallows, ½ oz chrome, red or crawfish colored lipless crankbaits and ½ oz white spinnerbaits are my top choice for finding fish. When they won’t chase, slow down with a suspending jerkbait and you’ll trigger inactive bass. Once I’ve found a school, weightless rigged Magic Shads and Live Magic Shads or wacky rigged Twitch worms in shades of watermelon are catching fish best. For bigger fish, a 1/2 oz blue bruiser Mega Weight jig with a matching Fork Craw trailer is your best bet when pitched to the deep weed edge or stumps along the creek channel. Out deep, Twitch Worms in watermelon or green pumpkin work well on drop shots, as do Carolina rigged Baby Ring Frys, when bass are located on the bottom. Both of these techniques will produce numbers of bass as well as the occasional big fish. For the suspended bass, I start with Lake Fork Tackle’s new big Fork Flutter Spoon in the Yellow Bass or Magic Shad colors. These catch fewer yellow bass and are great for catching really big bass. If the bass are finicky and won’t hit the big spoons, switch to ½ oz spoons and 1 oz tail spinners and you’ll catch some largemouth and lots of yellow bass with these.

Boat for Sale: My 2007 Ranger Z21 boat is now for sale and I’ve reduced the price. I picked it up in late October of last year and it is fully loaded, rigged with a 250 HP Yamaha with a 5 year warranty. It’s value priced and will save you over $10,000 off the cost of a new boat. For more details and pics of the boat, please check my website (www.lakeforkguidetrips.com) or drop me a note.

Website Update: My December fishing article on choosing the right hook has been added to my website: http://www.lakeforkguidetrips.com/fishingarticles.htm . In addition, I’ve added a discussion forum to my website. It’s new, and I’m hoping it will be a great place to find out more information about fishing Lake Fork and my services. Feel free to join the discussion at: http://www.lakefork.proboards91.com/index.cgi

Mexico Update: Fishing is off to a very fast start for the 2007-2008 season at Lake Baccarac, with lots of fish over 10 lbs being caught. All Mexico lakes go through boom and bust cycles and Baccarac is certainly peaking right now. I’m also working with a new lodge at Lake Guerrero. The new owners are very friendly and put customer service first, while offering very low rates for such a clean resort. If you’re headed to Guerrero this year, let me know and I can put you in touch with them. For more info on a trip to Mexico, please check out my website: http://www.bigmexicobass.com .

Here’s hoping you catch the lunker of your dreams. If I can be of assistance, please contact me at 214-683-9572 (days) or 972-635-6027 (evenings) or e-mail me through http://www.LakeForkGuideTrips.com , where your satisfaction is guaranteed.

Good Fishing,

Tom